Baby Perfume?

As anyone who has ever sniffed the top of a baby’s soft, little head knows – there is nothing quite like the scent of new baby. Sure, these miniature humans spit up milk and fill countless diapers, but still, nothing compares to the natural smell of baby. I’ve often joked with my fellow parents that we would be millionaires if we could figure out how to bottle the unique aroma that emanates from a baby’s head.

So why mess with a good thing? The perfumers at Dolce & Gabbana clearly believe that they can top what nature has already perfected. The company has developed a perfume for babies that “mimics the smell of a baby’s skin.”

What? Don’t babies do that perfectly already?

Dousing a baby with a synthetic fragrance designed to smell like what they already smell like may be a waste of time and money – the perfume retails for $45 – but it even more importantly, it may be dangerous. Synthetic scents – that is, those that are developed in a lab instead of derived from nature (think: flowers, fruits and herbs) are usually made with toxic chemicals that can be harmful to adults, which means that young babies, with their super-sensitive skin and underdeveloped immune systems, are even more susceptible to the harmful effects of synthetic perfume. According to the EPA, the chemicals in conventional perfume may cause “possible mutagenic and genotoxic effects,” which means that cellular DNA can be damaged or mutated, possibly leading to cancer.

Luckily, these days there are many options for a natural and satisfying fragrance experience. Natural perfumes are made without toxic synthetic fragrances. Companies like Tsi La Organics and Red Flower are making scents that are as delightful as they are safe. Just keep the perfume for the adults – baby’s got his fragrance covered.

 

About Marisa Belger

Marisa Belger is a Brooklyn-based writer, editor and mama. When not running around with her five-year old boy -- or preparing for the birth of his little brother -- she writes about parenting, natural beauty, wellness and green living for publications like Natural Health, Prevention and TODAYShow.com, or collaborates on books like Josh Dorfman's The Lazy Environmentalist.
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