Three Sample Homeschool Schedules

Parents can homeschool while also working from home with these sample homeschool schedules.

Are you suddenly homeschooling your children? And possibly also trying to work from home at the same time? This might seem like an impossible task, but when you are patient, flexible, and determined, it can be done! One important component of homeschool success is establishing a homeschooling schedule.

Getting started can feel overwhelming, and you’re probably wondering what a typical day should look like. As a homeschooling mom of seven, I get it, so I’ve put together some sample homeschool schedules. Take a look and you’ll probably find one that best seems to suit your family’s habits and lifestyle. From there, it’s just a matter of tweaking and adjusting your homeschool schedule until it flows. Remember: each family schedule and style will differ, what’s important is that it works for you.

Sample Homeschool Schedule #1: Double Duty All Day

This homeschool schedule works best for parents who have some flexibility in their work-from-home day and kids who work well independently. Parents work intermittently and also help kids with schoolwork in little bursts all day long. 

  • 6:30 a.m. Parent(s) wake up, shower
  • 7 a.m. Kids wake up, get dressed
  • 7:30 a.m. Breakfast. Use this time to let your kids know the agenda for the day.
  • 8 a.m. Clean up from breakfast together
  • 8:30 a.m. Time for work and school to start. The night before you’ll want to prepare a folder for each kiddo containing a few offline things (such as math or literacy worksheets or writing assignments) that they can get started on alone during this time. 
  • 10 a.m. Time for a snack break followed by a hands-on activity such as craft or something they can touch, move around, and learn from (without being aware they are learning). Once they are set up with this activity you can return to working. 
  • 11:30 a.m. Lunchtime! Take some time to chat about what everyone is learning and working on while you eat.
  • 12:30 p.m. Institute a short quiet time for everyone in the house. Read your kids a story – this is important for kids of all ages and abilities. Here are some great children’s authors who write books that parents love too. Then it’s quiet reading time for an hour (set a timer).
  • 1:30 p.m. Time to get active and moving! Take a walk around the neighborhood or if it’s too cold outside, do some exercise inside. Jumping jacks, a game of Simon Says, or a family dance off are just a few options.
  • 2 p.m. Go ahead and allow some screen time at this point. It can be an educational movie, website, or game on the tablet or computer..
  • 3 p.m. School’s out and everyone gets free time until dinner. Explain to your kiddos that you still need to get more work done, so playtime should be relatively quiet or outdoors and respectful of your working. 
  • 5:30 p.m. Time to get dinner on the table and have a family dinner together. If you struggle with getting meals together quickly, you might want to use your crock pot or instapot to have dinner going a little ahead of time. After a long day trying to balance work, school, and kids, a fussy dinner is probably not what you want to be doing.  
  • 6 p.m. Time for everyone to help with clean up.
  • 6:30 p.m. Spend some time getting ready for the next day. Although you’re not going anywhere, you will still benefit from getting organized for tomorrow’s breakfast and lunch, having the kiddos pick out their clothes, and printing out the next morning’s school assignments.
  • 7:30 p.m. It’s family time. Read a book together, play a board game, or just enjoy some cuddle time before bed. 
  • 8 – 8:30 p.m. Bedtime for the kiddos and time for the parents to relax and decompress!

Sample Homeschool Schedule #2: Time Blocks For Early Risers  

If your work requires a lot of concentration and focus, you’re going to need to make time in your days when your kids aren’t around to tackle projects and be productive. This homeschool schedule accommodates parents’ work from home needs with focused work time in the early morning (or late night, depending on which you prefer – just switch the morning work time to the evening hours). The homeschool day begins at 10 a.m. and stretches into the afternoon.

  • 5 a.m. Parents are up and starting work before the kids even stir. 
  • 8 – 9 a.m. Kids get up and get themselves breakfast (set out items ahead of time) so parents can continue working.
  • 9:30 a.m. Time to clean up breakfast together and talk about the agenda for the day.
  • 10 a.m. School is now in session! Parents can take a break from work and sit down with their kids for school during this time to read textbooks with them, go over the math lesson for the day, and assign them some things to work on after lunch.
  • 12 p.m. Give your kids a little time to run around outside and take a wiggle break. Prep lunch while they do that.  
  • 1 p.m. Settle your kids in for a quiet time. Some of your kids might have grown out of the napping stage, but it never hurts to have some downtime. They can read books, work on the assigned school work, or play quietly in their rooms while you get some more work done. 
  • 3:30 p.m. Free time starts now. Your kiddos may state they are “bored,” but being bored is a good thing because it gives them the chance to get creative. You can also have a few hands-on activities available for them if they seem to need ideas on what to do. Meanwhile, you’re still working.
  • 5:30 – 6:30 p.m. Dinner time and clean up
  • 6:30 p.m. Prep for tomorrow (see above homeschool schedule #1, above). 
  • 7:30 p.m. Time to start the kids’ bedtime routine.
  • 8 p.m. The kids are in bed and you get a minute to decompress. But since you’re getting up early, you should be heading to dreamland soon too.
Juggling working from home and homeschooling requires a flexible, but structured schedule.
Juggling working from home and homeschooling requires a flexible, but structured schedule.

Sample Homeschool Schedule #3: Day Blocks 

If you have a very flexible job, designating specific days for school and other days for work might work well for you. For example, you can work Monday, Wednesday, and Friday and set aside Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday for school. Sunday would be your break day.

On your workdays, you can give your child independent assignments and utilize learning websites like the free online school Khan Academy. On school days, you’ll take time to sit down with your kids and go over their work before diving into the next lessons and providing the instruction they need for that material. This works well if your children are a little older and can stay on task to get their work done well.  

Homeschool Schedule: Tips and Tricks

No matter what schedule you go with, there are a few things you need to keep in mind while making this adjustment.

  • Be flexible: Don’t let the schedule rule you, adjust as you need to.
  • Remember you are not alone: A lot of people are adjusting to this new normal, and no one is doing this flawlessly. Even experienced homeschool moms have rough days. 
  • Let go of the pressure: If you’re feeling like it’s a lot to get done all at once, take a deep breath and release that tension. Then make a list of the things that absolutely need to get done today, and do those first. Take the rest one thing at a time, and do what you can.  
  • Enjoy the extra time together: That means embracing the good, the bad, and the ugly. Don’t stress that it isn’t all beautiful and perfectly organized. Take the challenges and chalk them up to learning moments, and really celebrate the successes with a lot of praise for your kiddos (and for yourself too, mama!).

but when you are patient, flexible, and determined, it can be done! One important component of homeschool success is establishing a homeschooling schedule.

Getting started can feel overwhelming, and you’re probably wondering what a typical day should look like. As a homeschooling mom of seven, I get it, so I’ve put together some sample homeschool schedules. Take a look and you’ll probably find one that best seems to suit your family’s habits and lifestyle. From there, it’s just a matter of tweaking and adjusting your homeschool schedule until it flows. Remember: each family schedule and style will differ, what’s important is that it works for you.

but when you are patient, flexible, and determined, it can be done! One important component of homeschool success is establishing a homeschooling schedule.

Getting started can feel overwhelming, and you’re probably wondering what a typical day should look like. As a homeschooling mom of seven, I get it, so I’ve put together some sample homeschool schedules. Take a look and you’ll probably find one that best seems to suit your family’s habits and lifestyle. From there, it’s just a matter of tweaking and adjusting your homeschool schedule until it flows. Remember: each family schedule and style will differ, what’s important is that it works for you.

but when you are patient, flexible, and determined, it can be done! One important component of homeschool success is establishing a homeschooling schedule.


Getting started can feel overwhelming, and you’re probably wondering what a typical day should look like. As a homeschooling mom of seven, I get it, so I’ve put together some sample homeschool schedules. Take a look and you’ll probably find one that best seems to suit your family’s habits and lifestyle. From there, it’s just a matter of tweaking and adjusting your homeschool schedule until it flows. Remember: each family schedule and style will differ, what’s important is that it works for you.


Read more Homeschool Survival Tips here.